Song of Yste

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Title: The Song of Yste

Origin: Robert A.W. Lowndes - "The Abyss (fiction)"

Description

The writings and records of a family of adepts named Dirka, who traced their ancestry back to the pre-glacial days. They, the Dirkas, had translated the Song of Yste from its legendary form into the three great languages of the dawn cultures, then into the Greek, Latin, Arabic and finally, Elizabethan English. The book contains descriptions of "messengers from beyond and alien beings, entities terribly unhuman, impossible of measurement by any human yardstick or to be combated effectively by mankind", including a section on the abominable Adumbrali and their emissaries, the fiendish Seekers.


Pre-Glacial Version

  • author: Dirka ancestor, prehistoric
  • Language: "The Three Great Languages of the Dawn Cultures"
  • Number of known copies (if rare): Unknown
  • Last known location of surviving copies (if rare): Unknown, but rare

Physical Description:

General Content:

A transcription of prehuman legends into "the three great languages of the dawn cultures", "of messengers from beyond and alien beings, entities terribly unhuman, impossible of measurement by any human yardstick or to be combated effectively by mankind."


Greek

  • author: Dirka descendant, medieval(?)
  • Language: Greek
  • Number of known copies (if rare): Unknown
  • Last known location of surviving copies (if rare): Unknown

Physical Description:

General Content: A classical or medieval Greek translation "Of messengers from beyond and alien beings, entities terribly unhuman, impossible of measurement by any human yardstick or to be combated effectively by mankind."


Latin

  • author: Dirka descendant, medieval(?)
  • Language: Latin
  • Number of known copies (if rare): Unknown
  • Last known location of surviving copies (if rare): Unknown

Physical Description:

General Content: A classical or medieval Latin translation "Of messengers from beyond and alien beings, entities terribly unhuman, impossible of measurement by any human yardstick or to be combated effectively by mankind."


Arabic

  • author: Dirka descendant, medieval(?)
  • Language: Arabic
  • Number of known copies (if rare): Unknown
  • Last known location of surviving copies (if rare): Unknown

Physical Description:

General Content: A classical or medieval Arabic translation "Of messengers from beyond and alien beings, entities terribly unhuman, impossible of measurement by any human yardstick or to be combated effectively by mankind."


English

  • author: Dirka descendant, 16th Century
  • Language: Elizabethan English
  • Number of known copies (if rare):
  • Last known location of surviving copies (if rare):

Physical Description:

General Content: A 16th-century translation "Of messengers from beyond and alien beings, entities terribly unhuman, impossible of measurement by any human yardstick or to be combated effectively by mankind."


Mythos Content

Spells:

  • Sanity Loss:
  • Mythos Knowledge:
  • Occult Knowledge:


Quotes

“...And these be none other than the adumbrali, the living shadows, beings of incredible power and malignancy, which dwell without the veils of space and time such as we know it. Their sport it is to import into their realm the inhabitants of other dimensions, upon whom they practice horrid pranks and manifold illusions.... But more dreadful than these are the seekers which they send out into other worlds and dimensions, beings of incredible power which they themselves have created and guised in the form of those who dwell within whatever dimension, or upon whichever worlds where these seekers be sent.... These seekers can be detected only by the adept, to whose trained eyes their too-perfectness of form and movement, their strangeness, and aura of alienage and power is a sure sign.... The sage, Jhalkanaan, tells of one of these seekers who deluded seven priests of Nyaghoggua into challenging it to a duel of the hypnotic arts. He further tells how two of these were trapped and delivered to the adumbrali, their bodies being returned when the shadow-things had done with them.... Most curious of all was the condition of the corpses, being entirely drained of all fluid, yet showing no trace of a wound, even the most slight. But the crowning horror was the eyes, which could not be closed, appearing to stare restlessly outward, beyond the observer, and the strangely-luminous markings on the dead flesh, curious designs which appeared to move and change form before the eyes of the beholder. . . .”
— Robert A.W. Lowndes - "The Abyss (fiction)"

Appearances


Associated Mythos Elements

Heresies and Controversies

Keeper Notes